Friday, April 6, 2012

Another Belizean weather-related Fun Fact....

Last month I posted about the "Iguana Rains" - the last storm, over the Easter weekend, which brings on the hatching of baby iguanas and the start of the dry season: Belizean Legend/Iguana Rains

Well, it's Easter weekend, so we're about to find out if the big storms happens... we've had a little bit of lightning and some thunder over the past few nights, but nothing major so far.

What I heard about today - what signals the beginning of the rainy season in June - is the arrival of the "Flat Flies."

According to my sources, right around June 1st - usually right on June 1st - starting at about 2 or 3 in the afternoon, you'll notice a whole lot of flies outside. Swarms of them.
By 5 or 6, they're all over your cars and your house and windows, and if you have any cracks or holes in your home, they'll make their way inside.
By 9 or 10 at night, their wings start falling off and they turn into crawling bugs of some sort, and you're left with a house full of dead bug wings.
The next day, the rainy season begins.

I wonder what other kinds of fun treats I'm in for up here in the jungle....




7 comments:

  1. I just started following your blog. I like it! We have a house in Maya Beach just north of Placencia and Seine Bight, but we dont' live there all the time. Mainly in the winter, although my husband goes back and forth to work on a project. I'll be looking forward to reading about your farming in Alta Vista! Here in the States we raise diary goats, sheep, and chickens (roosters, for about 4 months just for the freezer). I would like to have a small farm in Belize when I retire.

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  2. Hi Sandy - I love Maya Beach! Of course I've only driven through, but it looks really nice :)
    Which part of the States are you from?
    We just ordered 4 pigs and we want to get some goats - but I know that goats can be a pain in the butt! Do yours eat everything in sight if you don't keep your eye on them?
    Feel free to get in touch the next time you're down here if you'd like to come see the farm!

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  3. We live in Texarkana, that's on the Texas/Arkansas border.
    Our goats and sheep run together on about 4 acres that is fenced with goat and sheep fence; barbed wire won't work with them. In Belize there are a lot of tropical plants that are poisonous to goats, but a lot of times they can discern what is poisonous and what is safe. Raising dairy goats can be labor intensive, but I really enjoy it. I am super busy during kidding season (which is now) for about 12 weeks until I sell them. I milk my does from kidding season til I get them prepped to breed again (Oct-Nov). We are in Belize in the winter and have someone that takes care of them while we are gone. The sheep we run more like cattle--they are pretty wild and we have to round them up in corral and run them through a chute. Sheep prefer grass, whereas goats prefer browse (trees, shrubs, weeds). I know there are more sheep in Belize due to the Dorper sheep program that Central Farm had going for a while. If you aren't interested in milking, you might prefer to get sheep if you have some good pastureland. I am thinking where you are in Alta VIsta the land is pretty good for grasses to grow.

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    1. I'll definately pass this info along to our caretaker, thank you! We absolutely have plenty of grass for some sheep and I know we aren't planning to do any milking - so the sheep sound like they'd be more suitable.
      Where do you stay in Belize in the winters?

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  4. we live in our Maya Beach house, it's on the lagoon side,not the beach side.
    As far as your grass goes, you might want to take a sample of the most prevalent one to Central Farm so they can tell you what kind it is and what the protein value is. That is really important in Belize because there are a lot of things that look like grasses but aren't nutritious--they are more like weeds. If you turned our sheep out there if it wasn't really nutritious grass, they would starve or you'll have to spend a fortune on feed and hay.

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    1. I meant YOUR sheep, not "our"....LOL! Typo.

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